Snapshot: I Name Charlotte

Photo by Tamika Galanis.

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Snapshot: I Name Charlotte

by Tamika Galanis
Southern Cultures, Vol. 26, No. 1 (Documentary Moment)

“The ruins remain overgrown with castor plants, which can be, alternately, an excellent source of sustenance if cooked properly or a natural source of cyanide.”

The colloquial Bahamian response to the request for someone’s name, upon introduction, is typically their name preceded by “I name.” Such a title seemed fitting for this project after I was supernaturally introduced to the story of an enslaved woman by the name of Charlotte—one of two women charged as accomplices in orchestrating the 1831 Bahamian revolt of enslaved peoples at the the Golden Grove plantation in Port Howe, Cat Island, Bahamas—a woman who has long lived in the shadow of Dick “Black Dick” Deveaux, the enslaved man who was hanged for coordinating the uprising and attempted murder of the plantation owner, Joseph Hunter.