Rich Man’s War, Poor Man’s Fight: Race, Class, and Power in the Rural South during the First World War, by Jeannette Keith (review)

Rich Man's War, Poor Man's Fight, by Jeannette Keith (University of North Carolina Press, 2004)

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Rich Man’s War, Poor Man’s Fight: Race, Class, and Power in the Rural South during the First World War, by Jeannette Keith (review)

by Jonathan F. Phillips
Southern Cultures, Vol. 11, No. 4: Winter 2005

University of North Carolina Press, 2004

The “southern military tradition,” the idea that the American South has been the most militaristic section of the nation, is a generally accepted view among many observers of the region. As one prominent historian wrote in 1984, “The militant South, the military South, prone to shoot first and answer questions later, did and still does exist.” The perpetuation of southern militarism is further reinforced by memorable titles and prominent authors—The Militant South by John Hope Franklin and The Fighting South by John Temple Graves. At the same time, other writers and historians have questioned the notion of the martial South.