The South as an American Problem Edited by Larry J. Griffin and Don H. Doyle (Review)

The South as an American Problem Edited by Larry J. Griffin and Don H. Doyle (University of Georgia Press, 1995)

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The South as an American Problem Edited by Larry J. Griffin and Don H. Doyle (Review)

by Peter A. Coclanis
Southern Cultures, Vol. 4, No. 2: Summer 1998

University of Georgia Press, 1995

In writing this review, I promised myself I would not start by alluding to a collection of essays on the South written almost seventy years ago by a dozen intellectuals associated with Vanderbilt University. Just because the new collection, The South as an American Problem, is the work of a dozen writers associated (more or less) with Vanderbilt University was no reason to take such a stand—or so I thought. But, alas, there is no getting around it: Although The South as an American Problem is not organized as tightly as the famous Fugitive/Agrarian manifesto of 1930, it covers enough of the same ground to invite comparison, as Larry J. Griffin and Don H. Doyle, the editors of the newer collection, readily acknowledge.