Vol. 9, No. 4: Winter 2003

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Vol. 9, No. 4: Winter 2003

In the Winter Issue, we explore race and myth in O Brother, Where Art Thou?; Appalachian identity as defined by Appalachians; the Atchafalaya in photographs; the fight for racial equality in the North Carolina Extension Service; sin and salvation in southern rock; Confederate money; and poetic Georgia scenes.

Front Porch: Winter 2003

by Harry L. Watson

"Would the newfangled South have its faith in ancient treasure to fall back on?"

“Oh, so many startlements…”: History, Race, and Myth in O Brother, Where Art Thou?

by Hugh Ruppersburg

"It's a southern tall tale, the story of a confidence man, of a treasure hunt, of a man trying to prove himself to his children and estranged wife, of a political campaign, of three buddies on the road, of the quest for home."

Locals on Local Color: Imagining Identity in Appalachia

by Katie Algeo

"Movies, television, comic strips, and postcards feature the lanky, gun-toting, grizzle-bearded man with a jug of moonshine in one hand and a coon dog at his feet."

April—Deep South

by Phillip Goetzinger

"This amazing scenario—this land in flux—was the impetus for my journey south."

Georgia Scene: 1964

by John Beecher

". . . dragging that 70-year-old white lady down the courthouse steps with her head going bam on every step . . ."

“I Played by the Rules, and I Lost”: The Fight for Racial Equality in the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service

by Kieran Walsh Taylor, P. E. Bazemore

"You were there at the U.S. Supreme Court. Your name is called in that body of people. It was just frightening."

“Lord, Have Mercy on My Soul”: Sin, Salvation, and Southern Rock

by J. Michael Butler

"The band delighted in sharing their bottle of Jack Daniels with a chimpanzee."

Confederate Money: A Memoir of the 1850s and 1860s

by Angela Potter, Virginia Fendley Dickinson

"Butler was already firing on Drewry's Bluff a few miles from Richmond, and the cannon balls were falling in every direction."

The Lynching of Emmett Till: A Documentary Narrative (review)

by Stephen J. Whitfield

University of Virginia Press, 2002.

Nations Divided: America, Italy, and the Southern Question (review)

by Susanna Delfino

University of Georgia Press, 2002.

Fixin’ To Git: One Fan’s Love Affair with NASCAR’s Winston Cup (review)

by Daniel S. Pierce

Duke University Press, 2002.