Vol. 29, No. 2: Black Geographies

Vol. 29, No. 2: Black Geographies

In the Black Geographies issue, authors roller skate to claim space and joy, examine the role of the King James Version of the Bible in Black placemaking and meaning-making, mine the pages of literary geographer Gloria Naylor, and more. As guest editor Danielle Purifoy writes, “Black geographies urges us to reflect on, retrieve, and rebuild our relationships to our ecosystems and to each other that are integral to our thriving.”

Getting Free, Spatially

by Danielle Purifoy

“Black geographies urges us to reflect on, retrieve, and rebuild our relationships to our ecosystems and to each other that are integral to our thriving.”

Gloria Naylor

by Sasha Ann Panaram

“The Black South is not just a series of places, but a set of practices informed by Black southern women, placemakers who know the curvature of the earth and how it can help save those who walk on it.”

“Kick, Push”

by Suzanne Nimoh

“As Black skaters, we uniquely reclaim our rights to public space through our skating and insist on our right to public joy.”

Lost in Translation

by Javier D. Wallace

“They used the same things that prohibited their Panamanian citizenship—Blackness, migrancy, and language—to forge diasporic connections.”

We Are Virginians

by Barbara Phillips

“This year we will walk the land with the sixth generation and their seventh-generation children. . . . They will see through our eyes, and all that was will once again come to life and connect them to all that came before.”

Let’s Build Our Own House

by Darien Alexander Williams

“Political artwork produced by the Nation of Islam routinely invited readers to develop political and spiritual desires and expectations contingent on transformed relationships to an African homeland and life in the South versus the North.”

Be Ye Transformed

by Priscilla McCutcheon, LaToya Eaves

“Black people, both enslaved and free, transformed the KJV into a placemaking apparatus, one in which Black southerners collaborated to develop a common social, economic, and political vision, building institutions (the Black Church) and developing socio-spatial platforms to transform the rural South into a site of belonging and transformation.”

What Remains?

by Ashanté M. Reese

“What do we do with memories in the wake of spatial loss? How do they help to reconstruct places that may only live in the stories we tell?”

Reimagining Riddick Town

by Quay Weston, "Aunt Lydia" Whitley

“As I witness life in an urban area and the impacts of gentrification, houselessness, climate change, lack of food access, and economic uncertainty, I recognize the importance of access to land and place for people and communities.”

Back Porch: Black Geographies

by Regina N. Bradley

“The southern Black imagination reforms, revises, and reclaims spaces where Black people are present but unwelcome, underserved, or unseen.”

Natal Mythos (Atlanta 1993)

by Ra Malika Imhotep

“Grandma Sarah holds me / in a reservoir of unshed tears.”