Tag: Human/Nature

Snapshot: Water Treatment, 2020

Snapshot: Water Treatment, 2020

Monique Verdin

For this short “Snapshot” feature, photographers selected one of their photographs and wrote a short reflection on what it shows us about the ever-shifting relationship between people and place in the South.

Louisiana Trail Riders

Louisiana Trail Riders

Jeremiah Ariaz

Black trail-riding clubs have their roots in Creole culture that formed in South Louisiana in the eighteenth century. Today, trail rides are an opportunity for generations of people to gather, celebrate, and ride horseback. The riders form a distinctive yet little-known subculture in Southwest Louisiana, one that exists in stark contrast to most depictions of cowboys and serves as a reminder that Black equestrian culture stems from a time when the Louisiana Territory was in fact the American West. Black riders across the country have received greater prominence with the rise of Black Lives Matter and have taken the reins of a symbol long associated with independence and power.

Snapshot: Two Sides to Every Story, 2014

Snapshot: Two Sides to Every Story, 2014

Aaron Turner

For this short “Snapshot” feature, photographers selected one of their photographs and wrote a short reflection on what it shows us about the ever-shifting relationship between people and place in the South.

A Totally Different Form of Living

A Totally Different Form of Living

Justin Hosbey

This article is a critical reflection that explores the histories of water, marronage, and Black placemaking in the southern United States. It uses insights from history, ethnography, and cultural geography to connect the dual histories of racial slavery and environmental degradation in the Tidewater region of Virginia and the Mississippi Delta. This essay argues that, during slavery, swamps, bayous, rivers, and wetlands were geographies in which a fleeting Black commons could be sustained hidden away from the violence of the plantation. These same ecologies are now under extreme duress from coastal subsidence, the petrochemical industry, and climate change. This reflection argues that by charting the meaningful cultural, spiritual, intellectual, and practical insights of Black southern communities, an alternative ecological practice born of maroon imaginaries might be developed that could resist the degradation of these vulnerable southern ecologies.

Snapshot: Haiku, 2019

Snapshot: Haiku, 2019

RaMell Ross

For this short “Snapshot” feature, photographers selected one of their photographs and wrote a short reflection on what it shows us about the ever-shifting relationship between people and place in the South.

Snapshot: The Tea Room, Vizcaya, 2017

Snapshot: The Tea Room, Vizcaya, 2017

Anastasia Samoylova

For this short “Snapshot” feature, photographers selected one of their photographs and wrote a short reflection on what it shows us about the ever-shifting relationship between people and place in the South.

Snapshot: Yellow Finch, 2019

Snapshot: Yellow Finch, 2019

Laura Saunders

For this short “Snapshot” feature, photographers selected one of their photographs and wrote a short reflection on what it shows us about the ever-shifting relationship between people and place in the South.

Snapshot: View from Quiet House, 2016

Snapshot: View from Quiet House, 2016

Lisa McCarty

Snapshot by Lisa McCarty

A Humane Vision

A Humane Vision

Andy Horowitz

Introduction to the Human/Nature issue (vol. 27, no. 1: Spring 2021), guest edited by Andy Horowitz.

Front Porch: Human/Nature

Front Porch: Human/Nature

Marcie Cohen Ferris