Dixie’s Daughters: The United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Preservation of Confederate Culture by Karen L. Cox (review)

Dixie's Daughters: The United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Preservation of Confederate Culture by Karen L. Cox (University Press of Florida, 2003)

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Dixie’s Daughters: The United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Preservation of Confederate Culture by Karen L. Cox (review)

by Gaines M. Foster
Southern Cultures, Vol. 10, No. 1: Spring 2004

University Press of Florida, 2003

Many young southerners today may never have heard of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC). If they have, they probably did so when Congress refused to renew a patent on its insignia or when the Daughters defended the flying of the Confederate flag. A century ago, however, most southerners knew of the UDC and its activities; it was the largest independent organization of women in the region. Despite the UDC‘s historical importance, however, Dixie’s Daughters is the first (other than official histories) book-length study of the group.