Soul Clap

Rhythm and Resilience in Afro-Carolina Landscapes

Illustration by Ginnie Hsu.

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Soul Clap

Rhythm and Resilience in Afro-Carolina Landscapes

by Michelle Lanier
Southern Cultures, Vol. 24, No. 3: Music & Protest

“‘Rhythm is who we are—if we didn’t have that, how could we make it?’”

The question is: How do I render sound visible? For me, the answer is ethnopoetics, a mode of presenting performance, ritual, and cultural expression through the tools of poetry. In its possibilities for mirroring moments, and reflecting the spaciousness and impact of tone and silence and sound, the form seeks freedom from the strictures of prose. This is an ethnopoetic journey that invites rhythmic reading—listening with the eyes.

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