“We kept the discussion at an adult level”: Jack Kershaw and the Tennessee Federation for Constitutional Government

Photo by Shaun Slifer, December 2009, Flickr.com (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0).

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“We kept the discussion at an adult level”: Jack Kershaw and the Tennessee Federation for Constitutional Government

by Benjamin Houston
Southern Cultures, Vol. 20, No. 4: Winter 2014

"'The myth of rampant hard-hearted hard cruelty, that has occurred to some extent. There are always some cruel people in the world, but fortunately they're in the minority. That warm relationship between the races did exist in times of slavery and in times of segregation. Segregation, by the way, was a northern invention. Did you know that?'"

Just off Interstate 65 south of Nashville, a small private park bedecked with Confederate flags surrounds a nearly thirty-foot-tall statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest astride his horse and waving a pistol. “He’s crying, ‘Follow me!’” explained the sculptor of the controversial artwork, Jack Kershaw, who would later brush off criticism about the piece by asserting that “Somebody needs to say a good word for slavery.”

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