Rooted

Black Women, Southern Memory, and Womanist Cartographies

Floridawater II, 2019, by Allison Janae Hamilton. Archival pigment print, 24 × 36 in. Courtesy of the artist and the Marianne Boesky Gallery. © Allison Janae Hamilton.

ACCESS PURCHASE
Students and scholars can access articles for free via Project Muse.

Rooted

Black Women, Southern Memory, and Womanist Cartographies

by Michelle Lanier, Allison Janae Hamilton
Southern Cultures, Vol. 26, No. 2: Art & Vision

“Where are the elevation maps of our mothers’ dreams?”

Salt water flows in my veins, and I can recall my first taste of the Atlantic Ocean at two years old. I grew up hearing stories of how a six-year-old boy and girl, my maternal grandparents, met on a sandy South Carolina road and first experienced the spark that created my extended family. On this same road, Hurricane Hazel would one day claim Aunt Nette’s beach house, which she, the family’s matriarch, had proudly built in the all-Black resort town. Undeterred by that loss, that same boy, now grandfather and patriarch of the family, would awaken the whole house—sometimes neighbors too—and start a journey at 4:00 a.m. on a whim. We would all pile with our pillows into the wood-paneled station wagon and head for Atlantic Beach.

RELATED CONTENT