Tag: Appalachia

The Making of Appalachian Mississippi

The Making of Appalachian Mississippi

Justin Randolph

In October 1967, Mississippi joined the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC), a Great Society program that distributed federal money to local governments across mountainous states like West Virginia, Kentucky, and North Carolina. There’s just one problem: Mississippi lacks mountains. This article explores how segregationist Southern Democrats came together with northern liberals to reimagine and remap Mississippi as a place not reeling from the legacies of plantation slavery but merely suffering from a lack of economic development. I argue that this movement to invent “Appalachian Mississippi” countered the liberal War on Poverty’s economic empowerment of rural Black communities and tapped into larger currents of color-blind popular music. In considering the first hit song from a native of Appalachian Mississippi, Bobbie Gentry’s “Ode to Billie Joe,” this article suggests that popular culture resonated with political intrigue to redistribute American wealth through the South’s white powerbrokers.

The High and Lonesome Art of John Cohen and Roscoe Halcomb

The High and Lonesome Art of John Cohen and Roscoe Halcomb

Grace Elizabeth Hale
Curers, Charms, and Curses / Meddygon, Swynion, a Melltithion

Curers, Charms, and Curses / Meddygon, Swynion, a Melltithion

Peter Stevenson
Silent Ballad

Silent Ballad

Intro and photographs by Rachel Boillot
There’s More of It, But I’m Still Hungry

There’s More of It, But I’m Still Hungry

Courtney Balestier with photos by Elaine McMillion Sheldon
First Saturday in May

First Saturday in May

Tom Rankin
“Well, We’re Fabulous and We’re Appalachians, So We’re Fabulachians”

“Well, We’re Fabulous and We’re Appalachians, So We’re Fabulachians”

by Rae Garringer
Semantic Relations

Semantic Relations

Adrian Blevins
Pearl S. Buck, It’s Not You, It’s Me

Pearl S. Buck, It’s Not You, It’s Me

Jolie Lewis
Banjo Boy: Masculinity, Disability, and Difference in Deliverance

Banjo Boy: Masculinity, Disability, and Difference in Deliverance

Anna Creadick
Icon and Identity: Dolly Parton’s Hillbilly Appeal

Icon and Identity: Dolly Parton’s Hillbilly Appeal

Graham Hoppe, with photos by Tammy Mercure
Almost Heaven

Almost Heaven

Aaron Blum

The New Vrindaban is a Krishna community in the hills of Appalachia, the vision of A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, the founder and spiritual leader of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness. The New Vrindaban in West Virginia is the realization of Prabhupada's dream to establish a holy pilgrimage site in North America. It was conceived to echo Vrindavan, India, which is where, according to many Hindu religions, Krishna took human form. The devotees of the Krishna faith understand it to be the equivalent of Heaven on Earth.