Tag: Louisiana

Snapshot: Water Treatment, 2020

Snapshot: Water Treatment, 2020

Monique Verdin

For this short “Snapshot” feature, photographers selected one of their photographs and wrote a short reflection on what it shows us about the ever-shifting relationship between people and place in the South.

Louisiana Trail Riders

Louisiana Trail Riders

Jeremiah Ariaz

Black trail-riding clubs have their roots in Creole culture that formed in South Louisiana in the eighteenth century. Today, trail rides are an opportunity for generations of people to gather, celebrate, and ride horseback. The riders form a distinctive yet little-known subculture in Southwest Louisiana, one that exists in stark contrast to most depictions of cowboys and serves as a reminder that Black equestrian culture stems from a time when the Louisiana Territory was in fact the American West. Black riders across the country have received greater prominence with the rise of Black Lives Matter and have taken the reins of a symbol long associated with independence and power.

A Totally Different Form of Living

A Totally Different Form of Living

Justin Hosbey

This article is a critical reflection that explores the histories of water, marronage, and Black placemaking in the southern United States. It uses insights from history, ethnography, and cultural geography to connect the dual histories of racial slavery and environmental degradation in the Tidewater region of Virginia and the Mississippi Delta. This essay argues that, during slavery, swamps, bayous, rivers, and wetlands were geographies in which a fleeting Black commons could be sustained hidden away from the violence of the plantation. These same ecologies are now under extreme duress from coastal subsidence, the petrochemical industry, and climate change. This reflection argues that by charting the meaningful cultural, spiritual, intellectual, and practical insights of Black southern communities, an alternative ecological practice born of maroon imaginaries might be developed that could resist the degradation of these vulnerable southern ecologies.

Malik Rahim’s Black Radical Environmentalism

Malik Rahim’s Black Radical Environmentalism

Joshua B. Guild

This essay examines the environmental thinking and activism of Malik Rahim, a member of the New Orleans chapter of the Black Panther Party, Green Party political candidate, and co-founder of Common Ground Relief, a grassroots mutual aid organization established in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Rahim’s influences and career help illuminate an alternative history of Black environmentalism whose evolution runs parallel to the mainstream US environmental movement of the 1970s, but also diverges from it in terms of its primary concerns. Drawing from media accounts and extensive oral interviews, the article traces the development of Rahim’s environmental advocacy, locating him in a wider tradition of southern Black environmental justice activism.

A Humane Vision

A Humane Vision

Andy Horowitz

Introduction to the Human/Nature issue (vol. 27, no. 1: Spring 2021), guest edited by Andy Horowitz.

Cancer Alley

Cancer Alley

Monique Michelle Verdin
Forty Sundays a Year

Forty Sundays a Year

Pableaux Johnson
Finding New Orleans in Zululand

Finding New Orleans in Zululand

Millicent Johnnie in Conversation with Jennifer Atkins
New Orleans Second Line Parades

New Orleans Second Line Parades

Pableaux Johnson
Tasting New Orleans

Tasting New Orleans

Anthony J. Stanonis and Rachel Wallace, with illustrations by Kristen Solecki
“Release Your Wiggle”

“Release Your Wiggle”

Christin Marie Taylor
Pageants, Po’ Boys, and Pork on a Stick

Pageants, Po’ Boys, and Pork on a Stick

Emily Roehl and Jeannette Vaught