Tag: Music

Soul Clap

Soul Clap

Michelle Lanier, with illustrations by Ginnie Hsu

The question is: How do I render sound visible? For me, the answer is ethnopoetics, a mode of presenting performance, ritual, and cultural expression through the tools of poetry. In its possibilities for mirroring moments, and reflecting the spaciousness and impact of tone and silence and sound, the form seeks freedom from the strictures of prose. This is an ethnopoetic journey that invites rhythmic reading—listening with the eyes.

The “Good Old Rebel” at the Heart of the Radical Right

The “Good Old Rebel” at the Heart of the Radical Right

Joseph M. Thompson
The High and Lonesome Art of John Cohen and Roscoe Halcomb

The High and Lonesome Art of John Cohen and Roscoe Halcomb

Grace Elizabeth Hale
Comforter

Comforter

Skylar Gudasz

During the Covid-19 pandemic, at the beginning of the stay-at-home orders, we asked our friend and singer-songwriter Skylar Gudasz to invite local musicians, many out of work and not touring for the unforeseeable future, to share performances based around the theme of comfort. Recorded in the early days of self-isolation, the theme takes on new meaning as Americans pour into the streets to protest for Black Lives Matter.

New Faces of Tradition

New Faces of Tradition

Zoe van Buren and Katy Clune

Stories and portraits from the Millennial Traditional Artists project, a collaboration between the North Carolina Arts Council and Duke University.

Forty Sundays a Year

Forty Sundays a Year

Pableaux Johnson
Worth Westinghouse Long Jr.

Worth Westinghouse Long Jr.

Tyler DeWayne Moore
Jazz and the Magic City

Jazz and the Magic City

Burgin Mathews

This is the story of jazz in Birmingham, and of Birmingham in jazz—of how Alabama's "Magic City" helped create some of the nation's most swinging and celestial sounds, and of how that city, in the process, came to create itself.

New Orleans Second Line Parades

New Orleans Second Line Parades

Pableaux Johnson
Going Up and Coming Down

Going Up and Coming Down

Alex Macaulay, with illustrations by Phil Blank

Macaulay's essay traces the highs and lows of country singer-songwriter Kris Kristofferson’s early music career when he emerged as the standard bearer for a supposedly new and authentic Nashville sound. Focusing on the late 1960s and early 1970s, it examines the critical, commercial, and personal impact of such expectations at a time when Americans from varied walks of life latched on to country music and its performers as founts of honesty and authenticity that sustained often competing images of the South and the nation.

W. C. Handy and the “Birth” of the Blues

W. C. Handy and the “Birth” of the Blues

Adam Gussow, with paintings by Lamar Sorrento
Beyond Latin Night

Beyond Latin Night

Samuel K. Byrd