Tag: Texas

Queer Sanctuary on the Borderlands

Queer Sanctuary on the Borderlands

Joel Zapata

This piece explores the multiple Latina/o/x and Queer, social-cultural sanctuaries that exist within the El Paso-Ciudad Juárez borderplex. In so doing, the essay follows the author's move from the conservative Texas Panhandle to the U.S.-Mexico border, where they sought solace in a community in-between two cultures, two languages, and two nations. On the border, the author found a vibrant cultural hub for both Latina/o/x/s and the LGBTQ community. That is, the border is not simply a place at the peripheries of cultural worlds. It is a place of cultural making, including the making of a borderlands culture of sanctuary through which the author had the opportunity to see and explore their new home. Within that narrative, the essay surveys the social makeup along with the political and social history of Texas, the U.S.-Mexico border, the U.S. South, and these regions' various physical and cultural meeting points.

Texas Prisons

Texas Prisons

Britney Gulley
Eating Dirt, Searching Archives

Eating Dirt, Searching Archives

Endia L. Hayes, illustrations by Natalie Nelson

How does one respond to the history of a place that has eagerly consumed its violent pasts at the expense of Black life? This question became particularly relevant in April 2018 when the city of Sugar Land, Texas, unearthed the remains of ninety-five former convict laborers on the grounds of a former sugar plantation turned prison farm. "Eating Dirt, Searching Archives" speculatively plays with a history of Sugar Land that does not rely on the city's industrial legacies. Instead, this essay turns to dirt as the archive of Texas's invisible Black geographies. Dirt is theorized as a means of preserving Black Texas life and memory alongside the difficulty of Sugar Land's violent pasts.

The Kinetic South

The Kinetic South

Alex Hofmann

Outside Waco, Texas, a staged train collision from 1896 known as the "Crash at Crush" illuminates how movement and speed formed an organizing principle and perceptual framework for everyday life in the modern New South. After the Civil War, Waco remained unscarred by battles and unphased by Reconstruction. On the promise of starting anew on antebellum terms, white southerners moved to Central Texas in mass migrations that set off a boom in the region's physical and economic development. Looking at directories, city guides, and newspapers, this article traces how white southerners sacralized movement as a racialized privilege that structured their perceptions of their natural, built, and social geographies.

Snapshot: Paradise Road, Baytown, Texas

Snapshot: Paradise Road, Baytown, Texas

Eliot Dudik
What Fired Me Up

What Fired Me Up

Tish Hinojosa, in conversation with Brendan Greaves
Taquachito Nights Conjunto Music From South Texas (Music Review)

Taquachito Nights Conjunto Music From South Texas (Music Review)

Gavin James Campbell
Black Texicans Balladeers and Songsters of the Texas Frontier, and: Cowboy Songs, Ballads, and Cattle Calls (Music Review)

Black Texicans Balladeers and Songsters of the Texas Frontier, and: Cowboy Songs, Ballads, and Cattle Calls (Music Review)

Gavin James Campbell
Charline Arthur: The Unmaking of a Honky-Tonk Star

Charline Arthur: The Unmaking of a Honky-Tonk Star

Emily Neely
Texas Death Row and the Cummins Prison Farm in Arkansas

Texas Death Row and the Cummins Prison Farm in Arkansas

Bruce Jackson
Going to Texas

Going to Texas

Carolyn Osborn
Southern Borderlands

Southern Borderlands

Alex E. Chávez

"The strumming of stringed instruments booms out through the PA, elaborate fiddle melodies erupt, followed by the soaring voice of the poet-practitioner, embracing those present, scanning the scene before him . . . drifting, shaping, moving verses that elicit a chorus of gritos."