Vol. 24, No. 1: Food IV, The Coast

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Vol. 24, No. 1: Food IV, The Coast

We’re Going Coastal: Louisiana’s Shrimp & Petroleum Festival, sea-level rise on the Outer Banks, the Crabfather of Colington, Hannah Marry’s corn pone, Apalachicola ecology, and more.

Front Porch: Food: The Coast

by Marcie Cohen Ferris

“Discovering the North Carolina coast has felt like coming home, and its food and the fishing community who make it possible are at the heart of that homecoming.”

“Veiled in Emerald”

by Diane Roberts

“Florida markets itself as one big beach, white sand and turquoise sea, maybe punctuated with a theme park or ten. But look at a map: it’s really a place of rivers, streams, sloughs, and creeks, so many it looks like veins in a body.”

“We’ve Got to Be Awful Careful or We’re Going to Lose It”

by Anna Hamilton

“‘Dealing directly with nature is a very chancy proposition. She’s a sort of a jealous thing.’”

“A Self-Inflicted Wound”

by Rebecca Bond Costa

“The problem of balancing the public interest against the interests of individuals remains an ongoing challenge in the management of Louisiana’s coastal wetlands.”

Pageants, Po’ Boys, and Pork on a Stick

by Emily Roehl, Jeannette Vaught

“The Louisiana Shrimp and Petroleum Festival is not a ‘food festival’ in the way those events are often construed today, full of TV chefs and pop-up restaurants and brands and small bites and flavor innovations and swag.”

Georgia’s Wild Oyster Harvest

by André Gallant

“Bivalve mollusks are ugly creatures. They grow in clusters and possess razor-sharp edges. They stretch heavenward like spires on a devilish cathedral. They’re as wild as their habitat.”

The Fishing Village of McClellanville, South Carolina

by Vennie Deas Moore

“I felt a chill from the sea breezes still coming off the bay. It is hard to come back to a vanishing culture.”

Rising

by Baxter Miller, Ryan Stancil, Barbara Garrity-Blake

“‘I know God said He was not going to flood the earth no more, and that’s true, but the floods is still coming.’”

The Crabfather of Colington

by Georgann Eubanks

“For a long time, only coastal folk bothered to seize the moment of the crab’s transformation and make a sandwich of it.”

Carry On, Corned Ham

by Bill Smith

“Often, my good nights would include the question, ‘How did you all end up eating a whole ham?’”

Alongside Shrimp and Bluefish

by Andrea Weigl

“I have had a longtime love affair with Ocracoke Island . . . My tryst with Ocracoke fig cake is almost as long.”

Cut It Clean

by Sara Wood

“‘Oysters played a great role in my life, and I would tell any child on this earth that twenty-four oysters took me around the world.’”

Hannah Mary’s Corn Pone

by Bernard L. Herman

“‘It’s very hard to describe what that pone tasted like, except it was delicious. It was not really sweet, but not unsweet. It was dark brown in color. It was not light and feathery; it was of a heavier, denser consistency. It was just delicious.’”

Collards

by Maurice Manning

“It’s strangely refreshing / when nothing illuminating happens . . ."