Vol. 24, No. 2 (Summer 2018)

Students and scholars can access articles for free via Project Muse.

Vol. 24, No. 2 (Summer 2018)

What’s in the Summer Issue? Well, in Summery: David Sedaris’s South. Harlem’s Virginia Outpost. Punks in Pensacola. Sweetgrass baskets in South Carolina. A little known poet of Appalachia. Queer bounce of New Orleans. And more.

Front Porch: Summer 2018

by Harry Watson

“As virtually every southern writer demonstrates, home can be a wellspring for art, and for every writer that stayed there’s another long list of southerners who left home.”

De-Located Yankees

by Brian Glover

This article is excerpted from the Summer 2018 Issue. To read the full essay, visit Project MUSE.

Sacred Spaces

by John M. Hall, Jeffery Beam

“‘I write about some of the things I love. But I have no civilized articulation for the things I hate.’”

Rebecca Cushman, Mountain Gal

by Michael McFee

“Cushman is always an elegist, in prose or poetry, writing about ‘the old life’ and its characters, all passing away, as she herself is.”

Seasoned Punks

by André Gallant

We knew to call out from work when the Pipe Bomb came to town. The next day promised a wicked hangover, maybe leftovers. This was slow food for broke folks, and the afternoons stretched on.

“Release Your Wiggle”

by Christin Marie Taylor

“‘I’m that queen that’ll make ya bounce!’”

“Life Gets Heavy”

by Clay Motley

“The blues won’t solve Clarksdale’s problems, but . . . it will keep you going another day and give you hope for something better.”

Babylon Is Falling

by Dale Rosengarten

“Basket makers have always known who they are and where they come from. In this era, they know they are artists too.”

From Georgia Peach to Art Historian

by Gail Levin

“My hope is that writing about how I found my way might help others who still search.”

Masters of What Would Not Be Discussed

by Dawne Shand

“Unlike its immediate neighbors, Selma and Marion, Uniontown could claim no mention in the historic record of the ’60s.”

American Honey

by Joy Priest

“let your freedom build slow like the death of a star across the years . . .”

In the Studio: David Sedaris

by Southern Cultures

This feature is part of a series collaboration with the "50 for 50" project, an initiative of the North Carolina Arts Council in celebration of their 50th anniversary.